European Student Mobility [2001-2012]

May 7, 2014 in Data Journalism

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  • Christopher Webb

    Some of the limitations you identify with Excel are addressed in Excel 2013 (and indeed in Excel 2010 if you download Microsoft’s free addin, PowerPivot, which is now native Excel functionality in 2013). You can load multiple datasets into an in-memory engine without loading the data onto the worksheet first, join tables, then query the data using PivotTables or cube formulas. It handles very large amounts of data and allows you to write complex calculations. Check out: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/bi/powerpivot.aspx

  • Jonas Lismont

    Thanks for posting this article. Now, I clearly want to use SQL databases! :)

  • Came Here From Google

    this was awesome

  • Great Article!

    You can also use the best of both worlds by easily converting your excel to a database using this web service http://www.excel2database.com.

    Yes, it’s a free service…

  • Alpheus Legoke Mokgalaka

    Excel is for beginners or learners not for running projects.

  • Hi Noah. This is a bit of a shameless plug(in), but I do think it’s relevant. I’ve made a plugin for Excel that enables the use of SQL inside Excel. I enjoyed this article and I saw some of your other work so I thought you might be the right person to ask for feedback with this, if you could spare the time. The website is http://www.thingiequery.com. I’m in the process of making tutorials, one is already on youtube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ld-mbyAGsow). Tnx for your time!:)

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